Posts Tagged ‘Arizona Immigration’

Voters Give Washington A One-Two Punch

Voters landed two punches square on the chin of the political fat cats in Washington.

It appears that the national voter sentiment about electing new candidates who lack experience and thus are not in the grasp of either the Democratic or Republican Party is alive  in California and South Carolina.

Last Tuesday voters in California passed Proposition 14.  Proposition 14 is to a politician what Arizona’s Immigration Proposition 1070 is to Illegal Immigrants.

Also on Tuesday voters in South Carolina followed up with an upper cut by electing a virtual unknown in the State primary to represent Democrats in the November Senatorial Election.

It appears that the voters in California don’t take kindly to the idea that money can buy anything, even a primary election. Tuesdays Republican primary election of Meg Whitman for governor  and Carley Fiorina for Senate seem to be evidence that if you have enough money you don’t really need good old-fashioned voter support or their donations.

Jae C. Hong Associated Press

AP Pic

Whitman spent 71 million dollars of her own money to defeat long time politician Steve Poizner.

Carley Fiorina spent 5 million dollars of her own money to win her nomination for Senator. In addition Chris Kelley who was running for California Attorney general lost his bid but not before he spent 12 million dollars of his own money.

In response to this voters passed proposition 14.  Proposition 14 is the first step to take away the two-party system in California.  It takes effect in the primary elections in 2012. This law does away with the notion that only Democrats and Republicans can vote in the State’s Primary. It also does away with the notion that you must actually be a Democrat or Republican to be a candidate in the State’s Primary election.

“Specifically, Proposition 14 provides for a “voter-nominated primary election” for each state elective office and congressional office in California. Voters can vote in the primary election for any candidate for a congressional or state elective office without regard to the political party affiliations of either the candidate or the voter. Candidates can choose whether or not to have their political party affiliation displayed on the ballot. “ (Ballot Pedia)

In South Carolina voters elected a virtual unknown person as their democratic candidate for Senate Alvin Green and sent home long time Democratic politician Vic Rawl. To add insult to injury, Mr. Green did not have a campaign, did not have campaign money, and has a questionable personal history. Rawl just doesn’t believe he lost to Green and is reportedly challenging the outcome.

-LA Times Pic

No matter what happens in the November General Election, the election of Mr. Green is an acute message to Washington and a victory for Democracy.

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Arizona legislature goes it alone without interference from Napolitano

————————————Immigrant bodies are removed from the desert———————————-

This article contributed by Guardian.CO.UK

Now that Janet Napolitano is no longer the  governor in Arizona the legislature  passed a bill that would prevent local police jurisdictions from being “soft” on immigrant law enforcement.  In fact the legislation mandates strict enforcement.

Pro-immigration groups across the US expressed despair today after Arizona passed the toughest bills in the country which they say are aimed at forcing out hundreds of thousands of Latinos living illegally in the state.

Arizona has long been a flashpoint in the debate over immigration, with tensions heightened by the murder last month of a popular rancher, Robert Krentz, in a remote spot used by groups smuggling people from Mexico to the US.

“The Mexico-Arizona border is out of control,” said the Arizona Cattlemen’s Association in a statement accompanying a report yesterday that claimed the impact of illegal immigration was so great the state could qualify for disaster relief.

The new bill, passed by the Arizona house of representatives last night, greatly expands the powers of the police in dealing with illegal immigration, including for the first time giving them the right to stop anyone on “reasonable suspicion” they may be an illegal immigrant and arrest them if they are not carrying identity papers.

All 35 Republicans in the Arizona house voted for the bill, while 21 Democrats voted against.

Pro-immigration groups said the laws are unconstitutional and promised to challenge them in court. Their passage was accompanied by noisy demonstrations, for and against, outside the legislature.

Chris Newman, legal director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, a union-backed organization, said: “I think it is going to be a disaster. It is the toughest immigration law the country has seen in a generation.”

He said he was troubled by the fact that a state was making decisions about a federal issue – especially a state with a poor record on civil rights. “It is the Balkanisation of US immigration policy,” he said.

Immigration divides opinion in America, which has an estimated 12-20 million illegal immigrants, mostly Latinos. Arizona has one of the biggest illegal immigrant populations, estimated at half a million.

The US economy is dependent on illegal immigrants to work in low-paid jobs, and law enforcement agencies in many parts of the country turn a blind eye to them.

The fear among law firms supporting illegal immigrants is that the new bill will lead to racial profiling, with its powers used to harass anyone who looks or sounds Latino. At present, police are not allowed to ask anyone if they are an illegal immigrant, and can only raise this if investigating another crime.

Under the new laws, anyone the police suspects of being in the country illegally can be asked to produce an alien registration document, such as a green card, that allows non-citizens a temporary right to work, and could face a $500 (£320) fine if they fail to produce one.

This will be accompanied by a crackdown on employers who take on day labourers, who often stand at specific street corners in the hope of being offered work. The new legislation makes it a crime to pick up someone if the driver “knows or recklessly disregards the fact that the alien is here illegally”.

Newman said that part of the legislation was the most obviously unconstitutional, denying a person freedom to seek work.

President Barack Obama, who on the campaign trail said it was not realistic to deport millions of illegal immigrants back to their own countries, has promised to introduce legislation to provide illegal immigrants with a route towards citizenship – though the timetable is slipping.

Now Arizona’s legislature has opted to take matters into its own hands.

The bill has a number of measures aimed at making life so difficult that Republican legislators hope it will deter illegal immigrants from either making the crossing across the Mexican border or, if they do, lead them to choose another state.

The bill still has to go back to the Arizona senate, but this is a formality. It will then go to the Republican governor, Jan Brewer, to be signed into law.

The legislation is problem for Arizona senator John McCain, who is fending off challenges from right wingers as he seeks re-election in November. McCain joined forces with the late Democratic senator Edward Kennedy to try to push through legislation to reform immigration laws. The move, which eventually failed, was opposed by many Republicans.”

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